Prosecutors Admit to Illegally Seizing Certain Items?– MJEOL Bullet #202

Prosecutors Admit to Illegally Seizing Certain Items? – MJEOL Bullet #202 In court papers stamped September 13 2004, the defense team for Michael Jackson continues to question the seizure of property taken from Jackson’s Neverland Ranch.  Through the court filings, we find out the prosecutors have conceded at least 20 items taken were done so illegally because they did not fall under the “plain view exception” nor were they listed on the search warrant.

Since warrantless searches are a violation of the 4th Amendment, anything obtained as a result—even the most innocent info like a financial magazine—is a violation of Jackson’s rights and subject to what attorneys call a “suppression” of what prosecutors have labeled as “evidence”.

The defense’s Reply to the DA’s Supplemental Response in Opposition to Defense Motion to Suppress says that prosecutors try to substantiate the confiscation of property from Jackson’s home by claiming it “may be a lead to other evidence or is indicia of association among certain individuals”.  They write:

The probable cause affidavit does not request and the warrant does not authorize seizure of items that may reflect association among people. (see Defendant’s Reply to the District Attorney’s Supplemental Response in Opposition to Defense Motion to Suppress | pg2)
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