Tape Public Never Saw is ‘Evidence’ of Conspiracy? – MJEOL Bullet #176 Santa Barbara News-Press writer Dawn Hobbs has written an article, “Tape called evidence of Jackson conspiracy,” which cites leaks from either prosecutors or law enforcement about a tape of the accuser and family. Apparently the accuser and his mother are caught on tape praising Jackson. Hobbs says her sources tell her that this is the tape prosecutors will use to claim a “conspiracy” against the family.

According to prosecutors, the tape was the cause for the alleged “conspiracy/abduction/kidnapping/threats”; the reason for the alleged trip to another country; the reason for so much prosecution-alleged panic. The problem is that the tape (or tapes) was never shown to the public in any form either before or after late Feb 2003.

Remember, this allegedly took place some time in Feb 2003. There was no hint or even suggestion of the family making a molestation allegation against Jackson at this time. So this tape certainly wasn’t made as a result of any allegation coming from the family. If Jackson wanted to conspire against an entire family for a tape(s) clearing him of molestation allegations, why in the world didn’t he show that tape(s) to the public?? According to the current prosecution theory, this tape(s) was the reason for the alleged illegal conduct involving “conspiracy”, right? Right?? Wrong. Hobbs barely mentions the fact that none of this information was made public—no tapes were shown, no audiotapes were heard, and no signed documents were released to the public with this family praising Jackson. But prosecutors, according to Hobbs, are saying this elaborate conspiracy revolved around this tape(s). At a court hearing July 27 2004, prosecutors made all sorts of wild accusations about everything from the purpose of Neverland to the purpose of actions taken by Jackson’s associates–which prosecutors have derogatorily referred to as “henchmen”. Here’s how Hobbs describes it:

“At a court hearing two weeks ago, the prosecution described a conspiracy to keep the boy and his family at Mr. Jackson’s ranch, hiding them out at hotels and arranging for a trip out of the country, so that they would appear in a video and say nice things about the entertainer” (see Tape called ‘evidence’ of Jackson conspiracy (Aug 11 2004)).

Let’s review that: “…so that they would appear in a video and say nice things about the entertainer.” That’s the allegation. The question is why in hell would Jackson’s associates conspire against a family for a videotape of them saying “nice things” about Jackson, that Jackson never showed the public or even so much as made reference to? What was the point of allegedly breaking the law, according to prosecutors, for a tape that no one got to see?? Even at the height of the insane media drumbeat, questioning everything from Jackson’s relationship to children to his fitness to be a father, the public never saw a tape of these people “saying nice things” about Jackson. Jackson didn’t use a tape that he allegedly committed “illegal acts” to get, for ANY purpose. Why is that? I’m sure the prosecution’s theory will now expand to include another lie to explain-away this one as well. Again, this is the tape that they “conspired” to get, right? “Broke the law” to create, right? “Threatened” the family to make, right? Right?? Please. Former Jackson attorney involved in conspiracy too? Yeah right. Also brought into this alleged “conspiracy” mess is Mark Geragos. Hobbs reports that it was at Geragos’s direction, with the help of Brad Miller, his private investigator, that the tape was allegedly made:

“Sources told the News-Press on Tuesday that it is the third videotaped interview, which was made at the direction of Mr. Jackson’s previous attorney, Mark Geragos, and his private investigator, Bradley Miller, that prosecutors are using to make their conspiracy case”.

This raises a whole set of other questions about what prosecutors are alleging. Are they seriously trying to claim that Mark Geragos, Jackson’s attorney at the time, was a part of this “conspiracy”? No amount of asinine theories can be leveled against another member of the bar in such fashion. There must be irrefutable evidence of a crime if this is the road prosecutors will take. They’re already in boiling water for leveling false charges against another attorney, who was acquitted on all 6 felony charges brought against him by Sneddon, before this Jackson case blew up. That attorney, Gary Dunlap, is suing Tom Sneddon in federal court for $10 million for a form of conspiracy (ironically), prosecutorial misconduct and violation of attorney-client privilege. Sound familiar? It sounds like ‘prior bad acts’ on the part of prosecutors to me. Dunlap’s lawsuit, recently upheld by the U.S. District Court, also names Asst. DA Christie Schultz-Stanley; Deputy DAs Kevin Duffy, Jerry McBeth, Gerald Franklin, John McKinnon, Josh Webb; DA investigators Mary Brizzolara and Tim Rooney (remember that name). You can read more about this in MJEOL Bullet #143. Another telling thing may be whether or not they include Brad Miller in this tall tale. If Miller was the one in-charge of making this tape, then prosecutors can’t rightly claim that they didn’t know Miller was Geragos’s private investigator. Miller was supposedly involved in making the tape of the family denying anything happened, right? Well then, when police ransacked Miller’s offices on the same day they ransacked Jackson’s Neverland Ranch, prosecutors obviously KNEW Miller was Geragos’s private investigator based on what the family told them when they were alleged to have been “forced” to make this positive tape about Jackson. Telling a lie to cover up another one only leads to conflicting statements and inconsistencies. Either the accusing family is lying about being kidnapped/forced/abducted or the prosecutors are lying about not knowing Miller was working for Jackson’s defense team. The former means that the “conspiracy” tall tale goes flying out the window and should be dropped against Jackson by the judge. The latter would be grounds to have the searches reversed and possibly the indictment thrown out. Refuting the nonsense Ronald Konitzer has supposedly spoken out about the ridiculous conspiracy theory coming from prosecutors. He’s quoted as saying, in an earlier report from Hobbs dated July 31 2004, that the conspiracy allegations are absurd; a sentiment shared by a number of observers. Even some legal analysts at Fox News (of all places) are scratching their heads on this one. The attorneys for Vincent Amen and Frank Tyson have also spoken out about these prosecution theories. The attorney for Amen supposedly told the News-Press:

“From what Vincent Amen saw, these people were certainly in no way under any type of duress. This family was not under any type of force or compulsion to remain anywhere. They freely went around to speak to whoever they wanted. They went shopping. They made phone calls. They did everything free people do” (see Jackson Associates Speak out about Prosecution’s Allegations (July 31 2004) ).

And that will be another problem with prosecutor’s theories: the family’s own behavior. If there are witnesses, audio or video tape of these events which clearly show them NOT being held hostage, what’s the excusing going to be then? What’s the excuse going to be as to why they didn’t tell anyone they were being held hostage WHILE they were being transported from place to place; allegedly at shopping malls, eateries, and expensive hotels? What explains why they didn’t contact the police and file charges against Jackson after they first “escaped” from the alleged “henchmen”? Geez. Tyson’s attorney, Joe Tacopina, has a few things to say about what prosecutors are alleging:

Attorney Joseph Tacopina said his client, Mr. Tyson, also said the family was not held against their will: “If she (the mother) were being held hostage, then I guess during one of her shopping sprees on Rodeo Drive she could have told a store manager while she was buying a thousand-dollar dress.” For prosecutors to characterize Neverland as a “place designed to entice children” is ridiculous, he said. “To say Neverland was constructed to be a predator’s mansion is, quite frankly, very offensive. Thousands of children have been through there, and it’s been the greatest moments in their lives.”

This is where it goes from being the prosecution of a case to slanderous PR. Prosecutors have no way of knowing why Neverland was constructed. They have no other accusers to shore up what this accuser is saying. Sources say they have no evidence at all of molestation. Those sources have previously said the 1993 accuser is not cooperating with prosecutors and don’t want to touch this case with a 100ft pole. So where are prosecutors getting the foundation for which to say why Neverland was built? They aren’t. It’s meant solely to slander Jackson and feed fuel to the media, which takes attention away from the serious misconduct and other unethical issues in this case. Tacopina also provides a reason as to why to this date, months after the indictment, no other person has been indicted or charged with “conspiracy”:

…Mr. Tacopina said, “the last thing Tom Sneddon wants is my client to testify at his trial. . . . They have no interest in charging these men — because if they do, we’ll answer to the charges, and then they’ll really have problems.”

Problems, indeed. The current theory put forth by prosecutors has been roundly panned. What’s more fishy is the timing of this article. It seems as if someone—some “unnamed source”—has fed this story to the News-Press for the specific intention of taking attention away from the real bombshells in this case. Instead of in-depth, written exposes surrounding why her district attorney is being made to testify in a case he’s prosecuting—where he’s alleged to have engaged in misconduct and other unethical behavior—we get reports about a tape the public never got to see. And the prosecution’s spin around that tape doesn’t stand up to even the most basic scrutiny. -MJEOL

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